SciJourn and CCSS and NGSS by Nicolle von der Heyde

 

Links between SciJourn writing guidelines, CCSS, and NGSS

In a Scijourn project, any or all of the following connections to CCSS and NGSS are possible, however not every article or research task will meet every standard.

A good SciJourner student article displays these SciJourn guidelines:

             (shown are links to CCSS and NGSS for each SJ guideline)

SciJourn guideline I:

             Has most or all of these elements: local, narrow, focused and presents

             a unique angle.

a.       findings are meaningfully applied to personal or civic issues and

b.      readers’ likely questions are anticipated and addressed.

CCSS:

·         The writing anticipates the reader’s knowledge level and concerns (WHST 9-12.1b)

·         The development, organization, and style of writing is appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience (WHST 6-12.4)

·         The research relates to a self-generated question and is narrowed when appropriate (WHST 6-12.7)

·         The writing takes place over an extended time frame and involves discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences (WHST 6-12.10)

NGSS:

Practices

·         Asking questions and defining problems

·         Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information

 

Crosscutting Concepts – SciJourn projects are inherently crosscutting because they draw from life experiences.  Students can be challenged to identify the crosscutting concepts related to their topic.

·         Patterns

·         Cause and Effect

·         Scale, Proportion, and Quantity

·         Systems and System Models

·         Energy and Matter

·         Structure and Function

·         Stability and Change

 

Core Ideas

·         SciJourn topics can fall under any NGSS core idea

SciJourn guideline II:

Uses information from relevant, credible sources including the Internet and

interviews. Successful authors…

a.       use Internet search terms and search engines effectively,

b.      privilege data from credible government and non profit sites and can justify the use of “other” sites, and

c.       locate and query experts and relevant stakeholders.

CCSS:

·         The writer must analyze the author’s purpose to find relevant, credible sources (RST 6-12.6)

·         The writer provides relevant data and evidence to support claims and counterclaims from credible sources (WHST 6-12.1b)

·         The writer uses technology, including Internet, to produce, publish, and update writing (WHST 6-12.6)

·         The writer gathers relevant information using appropriate searching techniques and assesses the credibility and usefulness of each source (WHST 6-12.8)

·         The writer draws evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research (WHST 6-12.9)

NGSS:

Practices

·         Asking questions and defining problems

·         Analyzing and interpreting data

·         Engaging in argument from evidence

·         Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information

 

Crosscutting Concepts – SciJourn projects are inherently crosscutting because they draw from life experiences.  Students can be challenged to identify the crosscutting concepts related to their topic.

·         Patterns

·         Cause and Effect

·         Scale, Proportion, and Quantity

·         Systems and System Models

·         Energy and Matter

·         Structure and Function

·         Stability and Change

 

Core Ideas

·         SciJourn topics can fall under any NGSS core idea

SciJourn guideline III:

Is based on multiple, credible, attributed sources.

a.       sources are relevant and reliable,

b.      stakeholders with varying expertise and experiences are consulted,

c.       sources are identified and basis of expertise is explained, and

                    all assertions, numbers, details and opinions are attributed.

CCSS:

·         Specific textual evidence is cited that supports the analysis of science and technical texts, attending to details, gaps or inconsistencies (RST 6-12.1)

·         The writer integrates and evaluates multiple sources of information presented in different formats and media (RST 11-12.7)

·         The writer distinguishes between facts and speculation in text and evaluates the extent to which findings support conclusions, locating additional sources  that refute or corroborate those findings (RST 6-12.8)

·         Compare and contrast findings from multiple sources, noting when findings support or contradict previous explanations (RST 9-10.9)

·         The writer reads and comprehends science/technical texts appropriate to grade level (RST 6-12.10)

·         The writer introduces claims and distinguishes them from alternate or opposing claims (WHST 6-12.1a)

·         The writer supports and develops claims using relevant data and evidence from credible sources (WHST 6-12.1b)

·         The research draws on and synthesizes multiple sources of information (WHST 6-12.7)

·         The writer gathers information from multiple sources, assesses the credibility and accuracy of each source, and avoids plagiarism through attribution of information (WHST 6-12.8)

·         The writer draws evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research (WHST 6-12.9)

NGSS:

Practices

·         Asking questions and defining problems

·         Analyzing and interpreting data

·         Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information

 

Crosscutting Concepts – SciJourn projects are inherently crosscutting because they draw from life experiences.  Students can be challenged to identify the crosscutting concepts related to their topic.

·         Patterns

·         Cause and Effect

·         Scale, Proportion, and Quantity

·         Systems and System Models

·         Energy and Matter

·         Structure and Function

·         Stability and Change

 

Core Ideas

·         SciJourn topics can fall under any NGSS core idea

 

SciJourn guideline IV:

Contextualizes information by . . .

a.       telling why the information presented is important both from a scientific and societal viewpoint, and

b.      indicating which ideas are widely accepted and which are preliminary.

CCSS:

·         The writer determines central ideas or conclusions from text and provides an accurate summary (RST 6-12.2)

·         The writer analyzes the author’s purpose and identifies important issues that remain unresolved (RST 6-12.6)

·         The writer introduces claims and distinguishes them from alternate or opposing claims (WHST 6-12.1a)

·         The writer supports and develops claims while anticipating the audience’s knowledge level and concerns (WHST 6-12.1b)

·         The writing is informative/explanatory and includes historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical processes when necessary (WHST 6-12.2)

·         The writer clearly introduces a topic, previewing what is to follow, and organizes ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories (WHST 6-12.2a)

·         The writer develops a topic by using relevant and sufficient facts, definitions, and details appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic (WHST 6-12.2b)

·         The writer draws evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research (WHST 6-12.9)

NGSS:

Practices

·         Asking questions and defining problems

·         Analyzing and interpreting data

·         Engaging in argument from evidence

·         Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information

 

Crosscutting Concepts – SciJourn projects are inherently crosscutting because they draw from life experiences.  Students can be challenged to identify the crosscutting concepts related to their topic.

·         Patterns

·         Cause and Effect

·         Scale, Proportion, and Quantity

·         Systems and System Models

·         Energy and Matter

·         Structure and Function

·         Stability and Change

 

 

Core Ideas

·         SciJourn topics can fall under any NGSS core idea

SciJourn guideline V:

Is factually accurate and forefronts important information.

a.       science connection is evident,

b.      difficult concepts are explained,

c.       precise language is employed,

d.      quantitative measures are given in correct and comparable units,

e.       information is up-to-date, and

f.        captions and graphics are checked for accuracy.

 

CCSS:

·         The writer determines the meaning of key terms and domain-specific words and phrases used in scientific or technical context relevant to grade level (RST 6-12.4)

·         The writer analyzes the structure of science journalism writing to help with the flow and understanding of ideas (RST 6-12.5)

·         The writer distinguishes between facts and speculation in text and evaluates the extent to which findings support conclusions (RST 6-12.8)

·         The writer reads and comprehends science/technical texts appropriate to grade level (RST 6-12.10)

·         The writer introduces claims and creates an organization that shows relationships between claims, counterclaims, and evidence (WHST 6-12.1a)

·         The writer supports and develops claims using logical reasoning and relevant, accurate data and evidence, demonstrating understanding of the topic (WHST 6-12.1b)

·         The writing is informative/explanatory and includes historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical processes when necessary (WHST 6-12.2)

·         The writer clearly introduces a topic and organizes ideas, concepts, and information to develop a unified whole (WHST 6-12.2a)

·         The writer develops a topic by using relevant and sufficient facts, definitions, and details appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic (WHST 6-12.2b)

·         The writer uses precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and/or figurative language to explain a topic while considering the audience’s level of knowledge of the topic (WHST 6-12.2d)

·         The writer draws evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research (WHST 6-12.9)

NGSS:

Practices

·         Asking questions and defining problems

·         Analyzing and interpreting data

·         Engaging in argument from evidence

·         Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information

 

Crosscutting Concepts – SciJourn projects are inherently crosscutting because they draw from life experiences.  Students can be challenged to identify the crosscutting concepts related to their topic.

·         Patterns

·         Cause and Effect

·         Scale, Proportion, and Quantity

·         Systems and System Models

·         Energy and Matter

·         Structure and Function

·         Stability and Change

 

Core Ideas

·         SciJourn topics can fall under any NGSS core idea

 

 

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