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This read-aloud explores the ways science writers include various sources of information in news articles to provide voices from different perspectives.

 

Read Aloud – attributed sources – why are they there

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Purpose:This lesson does several things – it introduces sources that you want students to know about and teaches them the acronyms that are commonly used to describe these sources. It also teaches the important skill of developing a brief description that can be used in both articles and conversation and asks students to become aware of the relevant websites.

Describing Your Sources: Looking for the Right Phrase (Editable Format)

Describing Your Sources- Looking for the Right Phrase (pdf)

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Including attributions (sources of information) in science news articles is one of the most important means of enhancing credibility. Many young writers are unaware of the use or importance of attributions. Readily available models are scarce. High school textbooks or teacher lectures generally do not include attributions. Providing support in the use of attributions in science news articles (and noticing when they are not present) will assist the students in understanding and valuing their importance.

Except for accepted facts, ideas and theories, all assertions, numbers, details and opinions are attributed. . . Attribution includes individual names or organizations, websites, newspapers/TV shows, reports, and press releases.
SciJourn Standards for Scientific Literacy

Objectives:
A) Students will recognize the value of attributions in articles they read and will ask specific questions when attributions are absent.
B) Students will work with a Track Changes style of making editor comments as they become editors themselves.

Materials: ARTICLE A Horses and Healing article
In this article, the attributions have been removed. Track Changes comment boxes are provided for editorial comments by students.

Time: 40-50 minutes

lesson – Who Says – Using Attributions (pdf)

lesson – Who Says – Using Attributions (Editable Version)

 

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